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I have heard of many ways to remove a tick.  These methods may be effective, but the goal is to remove the tick quickly and in one piece.

Avoid folklore remedies such as “painting” the tick with nail polish or petroleum jelly, or using heat to make the tick detach from the skin. Your goal is to remove the tick as quickly as possible–not waiting for it to detach.

SO, how should you remove a tick?  Here is the correct and quickest method:

Quick Tick Removal

Use fine-tipped tweezers to remove a tick. If you don’t have tweezers, put on gloves or cover your hands with tissue paper, then use your fingers. Do not handle the tick with bare hands.

  • Grab the tick as close to its mouth (the part that is stuck in your skin) as you can. The body of the tick will be above your skin.
  • Do not grab the tick around its bloated belly. You could push infected fluid from the tick into your body if you squeeze it.
  • Gently pull the tick straight out until its mouth lets go of your skin. Do not twist or “unscrew” the tick. This may separate the tick’s head from its body and leave parts of its mouth in your skin.
  • Put the tick in a dry jar or ziplock bag and save it in the freezer for later identification if necessary.

After the tick has been removed, wash the area of the tick bite with a lot of warm water and soap. A mild dishwashing soap, such as Ivory, works well. Be sure to wash your hands well with soap and water also.

NOTE: If you cannot remove a tick, call your health care provider.

You can use an antibiotic ointment, such as polymyxin B sulfate (for example, Polysporin) or bacitracin. Put a little bit of ointment on the wound. The ointment will keep the wound from sticking to a bandage. If you get a skin rash or itching under the bandage, stop using the ointment. The rash may mean you had an allergic reaction to the ointment.

Some ticks are so small it is hard to see them. This makes it hard to tell if you have removed the tick’s head. If you do not see any obvious parts of the tick’s head where it bit you, assume you have removed the entire tick, but watch for symptoms of a skin infection. Symptoms of infection may include:

  • Pain, swelling, redness, or warmth around the area.
  • Red streaks leading from the area.
  • Pus draining from the area.
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck, armpit, or groin.
  • Fever or chills.

If you have a rash, headache, joint pain, fever, or flu-like symptoms, this could mean you have an illness related to a tick bite. If you have any of these symptoms, or symptoms of a skin infection, call your doctor.

Sometimes we all need a visual:

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wotB38WrRY

What NOT To Do:

Do not try to:

  • Smother a tick that is stuck to your skin with petroleum jelly, nail polish, gasoline, or rubbing alcohol.
  • Burn the tick while it is stuck to your skin.

Smothering or burning a tick could make it release fluid-which could be infected-into your body and increase your chance of infection.

There are some tick-removal devices that you can buy. If you are active outdoors in areas where there are a lot of ticks, you may want to consider buying such a device.

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